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Katonah
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At Integrated Nutrition of Mount Kisco, PLLC and Blood Logic, Inc. we work in close partnership with you towards developing your natural healing plan. What you do not need is a generalized “one size fits all approach.”  Our approach for clarifying your health issues, finding hidden causes of your health problem(s) and developing natural solutions has been woven into our carefully designed longevity approach that we call The Blood Detective’s Longevity Plan. We believe that developing a Metabolic Map of your entire body by performing specialized health tests (e.g., biomarkers) is a truly holistic way of viewing, appreciating and managing your health concerns. As a concierge practice, we make ourselves truly available to you.  As a paperless office we are concerned about the world environment as it affects our “internal environment”…namely, your health.

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Weight loss, poor memory, intestinal issues, hormone problems, pain, fatigue, muscle aches and pains…whatever your health concerns(s), Dr. Michael Wald, The BloodDDetective has the answers…naturally. The Blooddetective blog is filled with dozens of radio shows on just about every health topic that you can think of. “Ask The Blooddetective is Dr. Wald’s weekly radio show covering nutrition and naturopatic, dietary and exercise, disease and health topics.

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#Autism-#Autism Spectrum Epidemic - Part 1

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The Autism/ASD Epidemic is a profound, eye-opening series of short, informative and practical talks presented by the Dr. Michael Wald - nicknamed the Blood Detective. Dr. Wald explores the criteria for autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), talks about potential causes from all angles and critically evaluates both medical and nutritional and natural treatments. Do you have a child or children with ASDs? If not, chances are that you know more than one family dealing, the best that they can, with the inherent difficulties of raising an ASD child. Tell others about Dr. Wald's eye-opening and hopeful exploration of what happens when the Blood Detective takes ASDs head-on!

Ask the Blood Detective Internet-National Radio Show!

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http://prn.fm/

National Internet Radio Show - Heard Around The World EVERY WEDNESDAY!

Featuring Dr. Michael Wald, DC, MD, CDN, CNS - aka, The Blood Detective. Listen here:  http://prn.fm/ 

This show will feature cutting-edge and original health and nutritional topics. Calls in will be accepted on some shows. 

Breast Cancer - Natural Prevention and Treatments PART I

mwald

Breast Cancer: A Modern Epidemic

Preventive Concepts & Strategies for Optimal Health

By Dr. Michael Wald, Supervisor of Longevity Services at Integrated Medicine of Mt Kisco

495 E. Main Street, Mount Kisco, NY 10549 914-242-8844 /

www.intmedny.com  / www.blooddetective.com

 

Breast Cancer Prevention & Treatment – The time is now!

Welcome to part I of V of my series on breast cancer.

My 25-plus years of practicing holistic health care has taught me one important lesson – namely, that regardless of what health issue someone wants to tackle it’s always best to attack it from as many angles as possible – and breast cancer treatment and prevention is certainty no exception. 

At no other time in modern history has there been more options for reaching and maintaining our health. Much is known about the potential impact of the environment, foods and nutrition, stress, exercise and other lifestyle factors for the prevention and development of effective treatments (natural and/or allopathic) for breast cancer. Below I have provided many of the most important considerations that I am aware of during my experience as a clinical nutritionist and doctor of nutrition. I need to stress that it is largely up to the individual to be educated in these areas in their efforts to be an active participate in their healthcare.

Perhaps the most important segment of this series of blogs introduces the concept of “biochemical individuality” or BI. In short, although thousands of nutritional studies for example have shown significant advantages of the use of diet and nutritional supplements for both treatment and prevention of breast cancer, it’s essential for one’s BI to taken into account when developing the most effective prevention and treatment strategies. Your BI, or individual needs, are best determined through coordinated efforts among your health care providers, your various tests results, your current state of health and health goals...just to name a few of the most important considerations that lead to personalized care. The area of nutrition including foods and nutritional supplements is largely neglected in traditional oncology care; therefore, pay careful attention to the nutritional portions of these blogs and consult my website and Youtube videos.  In short, nutrition is known to contribute to the development of many cancers, including breast cancer, and nutrition may play a significant role in adjunctive treatment of breast cancer enhancing the effects of certain forms of chemotherapy, radiation and surgical outcome, reducing side effects, offsetting infection risk (as a consequence of reduced immunity) and thus improving both quality and length of life.

What’s in a name?  The many forms of breast cancer

The term breast cancer might imply to some that the very same approach, whether allopathic, holistic or a combination should be the same for each individual; and nothing could be further from the truth. Each person has unique nutritional needs, different genetic predispositions to all manner of health and disease and responds differently to health care efforts, both preventive and treatments.  Even though I have designed health and healing plans based upon individual needs, there are many health strategies that one should keep in mind when it comes to breast cancer…whether women, men, young, old or regardless of any other individual differences.

NEXT BLOG: Breast Cancer - 13 Facts You Need to Know

None of the statements herein have been approved by the FDA (Food & Drug Administration) nor does this information substitute for sound medical or nutritional health advice.

Contact us for a free 15-minute consultation by calling: 914-242-8844.

Breast Cancer - 11 Ways that INCREASE Your Risk: Part III

mwald

Breast Cancer: A Modern Epidemic

Preventive Concepts & Strategies for Optimal Health

By Dr. Michael Wald, Supervisor of Longevity Services at Integrated Medicine of Mt Kisco

495 E. Main Street, Mount Kisco, NY 10549 914-242-8844 /

www.intmedny.com  / www.blooddetective.com

Lifestyle Choices

Here is part III of my blog series of V on breast cancer prevention and treatment. Read all five blogs to maximize your ability to reduce your risk and improve your quality and survivability if you should develop breast cancer. 

1.     Multiparity, or being pregnant many times, reduces one's overall risk of developing breast cancer. Not having children at all or having children later in life carries a higher risk of developing breast cancer.  Women, who have had their first child after the age of 30, especially have a higher risk of developing breast cancer.

2.     Birth control: Birth control pills or certain forms of injectable hormones such as depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA or Depo-Provera), carry an increased risk of developing breast cancer, especially compared to those who never use these forms of synthetic hormones.  Once a woman stops taking these synthetic forms of hormones, the risk of breast cancer is thought to decline. In my patient population, those that choose birth control or other forms of synthetic hormones are placed on various nutritional supplements, and emphasize various foods, that help the body better manage hormones in the liver and other tissues. Some of these supplements might include L-5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid (active folic acid), methylated B12 (active vitamin B12, activated vitamin B6 (pyridoxyl-5-phosphate, vitamin E (as d-alpha tocopherol succinate), calcium-D-glucarate, I3C (indole-3-carbinol), DIM (diindolymethane), vegetable concentrates and others based upon one’s personal health situation and goals and various laboratory tests.  There are dozens of other tests and nutrients that, when measured, can help your health care provider develop treatment and health strategies. 

3.     Breast density: High mammographic breast density (H-MBD) has been associated with increased breast cancer (BC) risk, even after adjustment for established breast cancer risk factors.  A large longitudinal study, the first carried out in Mediterranean women, suggests that specific dietary components may play a key role in determining MBD in this population, thus possibly modulating breast cancer risk. MRI does not involve radiation along with breast sonography and breast thermography offer additional preventative strategies for both detection and assessment of breast cancer presence and response to therapies.

4.     Receiving hormone therapy after menopause: Receiving progesterone and/or estrogen after menopause increases one's risk of developing breast cancer, particularly, it is thought, if these hormones are combined.  Once these hormones are stopped one's risk seems to decline.  Circulating oestrogens and androgens are positively associated with the risk for breast cancer in premenopausal women.  Several nutrients and foods have been studied scientifically to help the body properly manage hormone levels. The elimination of soy products and the use of nutrients such as DIM, vitamin D3, various phytonutrients, vitamin C and others should be considered in a comprehensive approach for treatment and prevention and based upon proper health intake and testing. 

5.     Breast-feeding: Several studies have shown that breast-feeding may lower one's risk of developing breast cancer in the first place, particularly if the breast-feeding lasts between 1-2 years.  Breast feeding also reducing the babies future chances of developing allergies, eczema and other health problems by helping optimal development of the immune system. 

6.     Breast Implants: Maybe linked to developing a form of lymphoma.  If this is true, then it may also be eventually proved that other forms of cancer and autoimmune diseases may also result from placing foreign substances in the body.  it simply makes sense that any foreign substance in the body may provoke an autoimmune reaction that may increase one's risk of many health problems. 

7.     Alcohol intake: Alcohol is clearly linked with an increased risk of developing breast cancer.  Even small amounts of alcohol, such as a single drink per day, increase one's risk of developing breast cancer. No one knows exactly why this is, but some of my theories include toxins in alcohol.  It should be kept in mind that there is NO SAFE LEVEL OF ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION THAT DOES NOT INCREASE ONE'S RISK OF DEVELOPING BREAST CANCER.  Also the toxin’s produced by the body in its attempt to metabolize alcohol can have adverse effects upon the liver and intestines detoxification enzymes.  Many nutrients and foods help support proper detoxification including, but certainly not limited to, milk thistle, N-acetyl-cysteine, ubiquinone, reduced glutathione, glycinate, methionine, alpha-lipoic acid, concentrates of dozens of fruits and vegetables and others.

8.     Overweight or obesity: Obese or overweight, particularly after menopause, is linked to a higher risk of developing breast cancer.  Basically, fat is an estrogen factory!!  More accurately, an increase in fat mass and a loss of lean body tissue is associated, not only with a greater risk of overall morbidity (quality of life) and mortality (death rate), but also a poor outcome from virtually all causes of ill-health and disease.  A test called a bio-impediance evaluation helps to insure that a person’s health efforts reduce body fat and cause no loss, and preferably an increase, in lean body mass.  The reduction of obesity would have been an effective strategy for cancer prevention, but the reality is that worldwide obesity has kept increasing for decades, remaining a major avoidable cancer risk secondary only to smoke. The present studies suggest that vitamin D may be an effective agent to reduce obesity-associated cancer risks in women.  With a balanced and realistic plan, I have found that most of my patients successfully lose a huge percentage of body fat. Weight gain and obesity are among the most important risk factors for post-menopausal estrogen-dependent breast cancer (EDBC). Weight gain is associated with oxidative stress, which in turn promotes breast cancer progression. Modulation through anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidants drugs combined with endocrine therapy may constitute a targeted approach in post-menopausal EDBC.  Fat is essentially an estrogen factory!

9.     Smoking: Tobacco smoke increases the risk of developing breast and other forms of cancer particularly when someone starts smoking at a young age.  Smoking can increase the body’s need for various nutrients and thus disease risk.  Nutritionally oriented blood work can help reveal many of these nutritional imbalances so that corrective measures can be taken.

10. Sleep: Day-shift workers: Meta-analysis demonstrates that circadian (sleep) disruption is associated with an increased BrCA risk in women. Working at night seems to offset circadian rhythms, and perhaps adversely affecting normal melatonin levels, increasing one’s risk of breast cancer development.  Melatonin, tryptophan, phenibut, magnesium and some other natural compounds may reduce one’s risk; in the case of melatonin, it should only be taken by day-shift workers if they plan on working on this schedule for the long term. Melatonin should only be taken at night before bed in those who are NOT day-shift workers. Those who are day-shift workers take melatonin in the day, but once again, only if it is expected that they will maintain this working schedule for the long-term. Melatonin taken incorrectly can adversely affect not only sleep, but can offset sleep patterns and other hormones. What is very important to know about melatonin is that it is proven to improve breast cancer outcome when taken by women with breast cancer.

11. Antiperspirants:  Aluminum Chlorohydrate is a common ingredient found in many under-arm antiperspirants, lipsticks, and sunscreens.  This ingredient can absorb through the skin and form malignant cells as a result of an accumulation within the tissue.

NEXT BLOG: Breast Cancer - Diet, Exercise..risk, prevention & Treatment

None of the statements herein have been approved by the FDA (Food & Drug Administration) nor does this information substitute for sound medical or nutritional health advice.

Contact us for a free 15-minute consultation by calling: 914-242-8844.

Breast Cancer - 14 Facts You Need to Know: Part II

mwald

Breast Cancer: A Modern Epidemic

Preventive Concepts & Strategies for Optimal Health

By Dr. Michael Wald, Supervisor of Longevity Services at Integrated Medicine of Mt Kisco

495 E. Main Street, Mount Kisco, NY 10549 914-242-8844 /

www.intmedny.com  / www.blooddetective.com

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Breast Cancer – what you need to know…essential facts and helpful thoughts

Fundamental Concepts

Welcome to part II of my V part series on breast cancer. The purpose of my blogs is to educate you and to expand your knowledge regarding cancer treatment and prevention - from both a medical and natural perspective. The science is in that demonstrates that both diet and nutritional supplements, if used correctly, can help offset one's risk of breast cancer and help improve quality of life and the effectiveness of medical oncology treatments. Whether you have breast cancer now, or want to reduce your future risk of potentially getting breast cancer, this series of five blogs is for you. Share these blogs with family and friends, both men and women, so that they too can benefit. 

Below are 14 essential facts that you should know about reducing your risk of developing breast cancer in the first place and to aggressively manage breast cancer if it should happen to you:

1.     Gender: Breast cancer is much more common in women than in men. Regular self-breast examinations are important to learn the anatomy of your breasts, and to detect as early as possible any obvious changes.  Follow up with your gynecologist if you find anything that concerns you. Discuss with your OB how to perform a breast examination.

2.     Age: As one gets older the risk of most forms of cancer, and a variety of other degenerative diseases, increases.  Therefore, it’s important not to neglect preventative lifestyle practices, like those mentioned throughout this series of blogs, as one moves through the aging process.

3.     Certain genetic factors strongly increase one's risk of breast cancer including mutations in the genes called BRACA1 and BRACA2. Only 5-10% of breast cancer cases carry this inherited mutations association which means that the large majority of breast cancers do not involve the BRACA1 and 2 inherited gene mutation associations.  Genetic testing can identify some women who have inherited mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes (or less commonly in other genes such as PTEN or TP53). Most often women and men develop breast cancer as a consequence of poor lifestyle such as diet, environment and other factors. 

a.     Other genetic factors, known as “low-penetrance mutations” or “gene variations “ are a factor in cancer development in the majority of woman and men. Simply put, the environment, and our lifestyle including diet, stress, sleep, exercise and other factors, “wash over” our genes over the course of our lifetime and cause what’s called multiple genes (as opposed to having only the BRACA1 and BRACA2 genes), or causing an imbalance between cancer suppressor (anticancer) and oncogenes (cancer-promoting) genes.

4.     Family history: Breast cancer risk is much higher in those with a family history of breast cancer as well as prostate cancer.  If you have a family history of breast cancer, or most other forms of cancer, it’s prudent to be mindful of the preventative and treatment concepts I’ve described throughout this blog.

5.     Personal health history of breast cancer: If a woman is already had breast cancer in one breast, her chances of getting breast cancer in the other breast are far greater than those without a personal history of breast cancer.

6.     Race: Statistically speaking, Caucasian women are more likely to develop breast cancer than African American women.  However, African-American women, once they get breast cancer, generally have a more aggressive course of breast cancer and are far more likely to die of it. 

7.     Dense breasts: Generally speaking, the more glandular the breast tissue the less fat in the breast.  Women with more dense breasts have a statistically high risk of developing breast cancer.

8.     Breast cancer problems: It seems that certain so-called benign breast cancer health issues may carry an increased risk of breast cancer such as having dense breasts.

9.     Lobular carcinoma in situ: In this breast condition, cells that resemble cancer cells are found within the milk-making glands or lobules of the breast.  These cells do not go through the lobules and therefore do not spread to other parts of the body but, even though it is not considered a true cancer or even a precancerous condition, having LCIS does statistically increase a women's risk of developing breast cancer at some point in her life.

10. Menstrual periods: The earlier the onset of menstrual bleeding, particularly before age twelve, and the later one experiences menopause, the greater the risk of breast cancer development. Estrogen, especially, in a form of estrogen known as 17-beta-estradiole, is strongly cancer promoting (carcinogenic). Early onset of menses and later onset menopause exposes the breast, ovaries and other body tissues to pro-carcinogenic forms of estrogen for longer; the longer the breast tissue is exposed to estrogen the greater its risk.

11. Breast radiation: Exposure to the breasts to radiation increases one's risk of developing breast cancer.

12. Diethylstilbestrol (DES): Diethylstilbestrol received during pregnancy carries an increased risk of developing breast cancer.

13. Xeno-estrogens, plastics and pesticides found in our food, water and air may substantially cause, or at least contribute to, the risk of developing breast cancer.

14. Nutritional factors are extremely important enhancing one's risk of getting breast cancer. Low levels of vitamin D3, osteoporosis and degenerative arthritis and hardening of the arteries - especially when they occur together in an individual, increase the risk of breast cancer. Think about it - if a person is low in vitamin D3 calcium leaves bone causing osteoporosis and osteopenia and can deposit calcium in the breast tissue causing calcium-laiden breast cysts - a strong and agreed upon risk factor for breast cancer development. Calcium deposits in joints and arteries is called arthritis and arteriosclerosis respectively both arising from dyscalcemia. There are several other health issues and nutritional deficiencies that can increase one's risk of breast cancer, but are beyond the length of my blogs to explore.

NEXT BLOG: Breast Cancer - 11 Ways that INCREASE Your Risk

None of the statements herein have been approved by the FDA (Food & Drug Administration) nor does this information substitute for sound medical or nutritional health advice.

Contact us for a free 15-minute consultation by calling: 914-242-8844.

 

 

 

Breast Cancer - Diet, Exercise..risk, prevention & Treatment: Part IV

mwald

Breast Cancer: A Modern Epidemic

Preventive Concepts & Strategies for Optimal Health

By Dr. Michael Wald, Supervisor of Longevity Services at Integrated Medicine of Mt Kisco

495 E. Main Street, Mount Kisco, NY 10549 914-242-8844 /

www.intmedny.com  / www.blooddetective.com

The Essential Role of Nutrition and Exercise in Breast Cancer Treatment & Prevention

Practicing Healthy Lifestyle measures including diet and taking nutritional supplements has been shown in scientific studies to reduce one's risk of developing breast cancer and aids the successful treatment of breast cancer. Dietary and nutritional supplements, in my opinion, should be used by all people wishing to reduce risk and improve outcome, but should be carefully determined by a qualified clinical nutritionist.  

Below are some of my basic considerations in the area of diet and nutritional supplements. 

·      Diet

o   A few studies have evaluated the association between diet and mammographic breast density (MBD) and results are inconsistent. MBD, a well-recognized risk factor for breast cancer, has been proposed as a marker of cumulative exposure to hormones and growth factors. Diets with a high glycemic index (GI) or glycemic load (GL) may increase breast cancer risk, via an effect on the insulin-like growth factor axis. A positive association was suggested for increasing simple sugar and total carbohydrates intakes limited to the highest quintiles.

o   The consumption of probiotics (healthy bacteria) and fermented products (i.e., lactobacillus plantarum) containing lactic acid bacteria was associated to reduce breast cancer risk.

o   It was observed that a balance of fatty acids similar to those of traditional Mediterranean diet, the consumption of fruits and vegetables, dietary fiber intake, vitamin supplementation are, along with the intake of probiotic products, the most extensively studied by the negative association to breast cancer risk. Omega 3 fatty acids from fish is probably the best source – as long as it is free of heavy metals such as mercury and aluminum (found in fish of all types).

o   Green/yellow and light colored vegetables were associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. I favor the addition of concentrates of fruits and vegetables that are essentially dehydrated products that can easily be taken as a delicious drink in addition to a balanced diet. See www.blooddetective.com and search Green Detox, Reds Protect, Brain Energy Blast and Longevity Complete - these products have not been studied directly for breast cancer prevention or treatment, but many of their ingredients have). 

·      Exercise

o   Avoiding obesity: Scientific evidences have suggested that obesity has associated with increased risk for a plenty of different types of cancer. The evidences are the most consistent for endometrial cancer, breast cancer between the postmenopausal women, and renal cell cancer.

o   Exercise during breast cancer treatment is perceived to enhance the patients' wellness on several dimensions and in particular psychological wellness. Exercise might support the patients' efforts to restore their sense of wellness and enhance their level of daily life functioning.  Exercise improves liver and intestinal detoxification of cancer-promoting estrogen such as estradiole.

o   Physical activity, may be able to counteract genetic susceptibility to breast cancer.  Exercise has shown to be a protective factor for breast cancer, increases the level of DNA methylation. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), a confirmed breast cancer susceptibility gene, is predisposed to be methylated. Therefore, DNA methylation related genes, such as methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) or active folic acid.

o   Motivate breast cancer patients toward engaging in a healthy lifestyle early after diagnosis and adhering to PA programs, which should be included in their clinical management.  Exercise has shown to improve quality of life for those pre and post breast cancer.

o   Pre-, concurrent and post-chemo nutrition to prevent increased risk of various cancers resulting directly from the immunosuppressive long-term effects of chemotherapy. Also to offset the risk, depending upon the form(s) of chemotherapy, of “chemo-brain, peripheral neuropathies, gastrointestinal and other health issues.

 

Nutritional supplements

o   Multivitamin and breast cancer

§  Although this study is a case-control study in which the risk of BC could not be assessed, results suggest that vitamin supplementation could be an independent protective factor for BC. Calcium intake appears to affect DRC in a positive way, because it was associated with a high DRC (DNA repair capacity) level, which in turn is associated with low odds for BC.  (Postmenopausal women with invasive breast cancer using MVM had lower breast cancer mortality than non-users. The results suggest a possible role for daily MVM use in attenuating breast cancer mortality in women with invasive breast cancer but the findings require confirmation. (Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2013 Oct;141(3):495-505. doi: 10.1007/s10549-013-2712-x. Epub 2013 Oct 9. Multivitamin and mineral use and breast cancer mortality in older women with invasive breast cancer in the women's health initiative.)

o   Studies show there is an inverse relationship between the low serum levels of vitamin D and the breast cancer risk and mortality

§  Therefore increasing serum levels will reduce ones risk for development.

o   Antioxidants: The resulting oxidative stress might also play a relevant role in several stages of the carcinogenic process.

Vitamin D3: A meta-analysis, a comprehensive analysis of well-designed scientific studies, provides evidence of a significantly inverse association between serum vitamin D3 levels (as 25(OH)D) and breast cancer risk.  Some studies have also shown that vitamin D3 supplementation in patients with non-metastatic (did not spread to other parts of the body) HER2+ breast cancer is associated with improved DFS (disease-free survival).

Vitamin E and Vitamin C: Severe α-tocopherol deficiency could increase breast cancer risk. The association between plasma vitamin C and breast cancer was only significant in case-control studies.  Intravenous vitamin C and vitamin K have been shown to be a safe and effective adjunctive treatment for breast and other forms of cancer.

Melatonin: Due to anti-estrogenic properties, melatonin is considered to exhibit a protective role against the development of breast cancer (BC).  An inverse association between BC risk and the highest levels of urinary aMT6s

See below for various nutritional based treatments shown to reduce breast cancer risk.

Dehydrated Fruits and Vegetables: Fruits and vegetables contain hundreds of healthful natural compounds and dozens and dozens of anti-cancer compounds – both to help prevent and treat various types of cancers including breast cancer. Many of the plant or phyto-nutrients found in plants are contained with my formulations called –

1.     Green’s Detox - http://www.blooddetective.com/green-detox

2.     Red’s Protect - http://www.blooddetective.com/reds-protect

3.     Longevity Complete  - http://www.blooddetective.com/longevity-complete

4.     Brain Energy Blast - http://www.blooddetective.com/brain-energy-blast

For more about the above nutritional supplements go to: www.blooddetect.com

Biochemical Uniqueness – How and why to get tested for your unique nutritional imbalances 

The number and variety of nutritional products including vitamins, minerals herbs and other nutritional compounds scientifically studied for both prevention and treatment of breast cancer is far beyond the scope of these blogs.  It’s important to keep in mind that a careful health and medical history, nutritional questionnaires, detailed laboratory and functional tests are performed. Here are a few examples of the most important tests that I use to determine the right type of food plan and nutritional supplements to provide my patients – whether they wish to prevent and treat breast cancer.

1.     Complete Blood Count and Chemistry Profile: These lab panels include red and white blood cells, electrolytes and other basic tests, but I further evaluate them by performing a nutritional interpretation of each of my patients results by comparing them to healthy individuals and not merely “average” people – this is what the regular tests ranges used by all doctors (known as “clinical” ranges) compare people to. Bottom line, if you want average health then use only “clinical ranges”; if you want a shot at optimal health then also use “functional ranges”.

2.     Homocysteine and Methylmalonic acid tests: These tests, when combined let me know if my patients are receiving the appropriate amounts of, and USING,  vitamin B6, folic acid and vitamin 12 correctly. Eating foods and taking nutritional supplements with these or other nutritional compounds does not always mean that one is absorbing or using their nutrients properly. Active folic acid, B12 and B6 is not the same as what most foods or even vitamin supplements contain. It is essential, especially in the case of folic acid, to take only the active form; it’s important for reducing cancer risk in the first place and plays a potentially important role in cancer treatment as well.  

3.     Vitamin D3 (25-OH) and vitamin D3 (1, 25-OH): The higher normal one’s level of vitamin D the lower one’s overall morbidity and mortality from any cause of death.

4.     Vitamin C serum levels: The higher the blood levels the better for breast cancer treatment.

5.     CRP-cardio – A non-specific inflammatory marker with important nutritional considerations.  CRP in the “cardio” form of the test, is thought to be the single most predictive blood test that predicts morbidity and mortality (along with other tests).  Different type of inflammatory markers reveal other potential health issues and nutrient needs and include: ESR, fibrinogen, ferritin and tumor necrosis factor alpha and others.

6.     Antibody Profile – A panel that measures a variety of antibodies that identify potential nutritional targets.

7.     Comprehensive Immune Testing: We have many immune systems. The most important that should be measured, and can reveal many important nutritional clues, include: cell-mediated immune tests, complement immune testing and Humoral Immune Tests.

8.     Body Composition Tests – A simple test that measures one’s percentage of muscle, water and fat and metabolic rate – all important predictive markers of disease risk and survivability.

9.     Sonogram Bone Density: Loss of bone density may be associated with calcium breast cysts (highly predictive of breast cancer development), osteoarthritis and hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis).

 

This is my short list – other evaluations are based on the unique health history, stage of disease, health goals and other factors.

 

Environmental Chemicals & Breast Cancer That Might Influence Breast Cancer Development & Recovery

1.     Most DNA mutations related to breast cancer occur in single breast cells during a woman's life rather than having been inherited. 

2.     85,000 synthetic chemicals on the market today including, but not limited to, preservatives, lipstick, sunscreens, and deodorants, the flame retardants to our sofas, plasticizers in our water bottles, pesticides on our fruits and vegetables, and GMOs.

3.     70% of those with breast cancer have no known risk factors like late menopause, children late in life or family history or genes.

4.     Non-industrialized countries have lower rates of breast cancer compared with industrialized countries; those who move to countries with lower rates experienced lower rates.  Estrogen is linked to development of breast cancer.  Xenoestrogens act like estrogens (weed killers and pesticides, plastic additives or by-products, ingredients in spray paints and paint removers, and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), used in food manufacture and food packaging, medical products, cars, toys, credit cards, appliances, and rainwear.

5.     The burden of environmental chemicals has been underestimated (http://www.bcaction.org/our-take-on-breast-cancer/environment/)

What are some simple lifestyle considerations to reduce ones risk include?

·      No smoking and avoidance of second hand smoke and air pollution.

·      Eliminate saturated and trans fats.

·      No alcohol: Alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, increasing linearly even with a moderate consumption and irrespectively of the type of alcoholic beverage.

·      Avoiding Estrogens are known that they may produce breast cancer by actions on estrogen receptors and also as chemical carcinogens, as a consequence of their oxidation leading to reactive metabolites.

·      Avoiding excessive radiation and taking nutritional precautions are associated with a reduction in risks. 

·      Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for cancer such as pancreatic, liver, colorectal and breast cancer. In addition, diabetes decreases the risk of prostate cancer.  Further stressing the importance of diet, exercise, and proper supplementation.

·      Infections (viruses) and breast cancer

o   Human Papilloma virus HPV- High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the causative agent of several cancers especially breast cancer.

o   Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a common herpes virus, has been reported to be a risk factor for many diseases, including malignant diseases such as glioma, neuroblastoma, and breast cancer.

o   Evidence is accumulating that one or more beta-retrovirus is associated with human breast cancer.

 

Q-What treatments for breast cancer that are in studies now do you see as the new movement for treatment?

·      Intravenous vitamin C (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23916956)

o   Plasma antioxidants are supposed to be directly related to breast cancer risk.

o   Severe α-tocopherol deficiency could increase breast cancer risk. 

·      Intravenous infusions of modest doses of DHA may have potential for optimizing the intracellular ascorbate content of cancers, potentially rendering them less aggressive. 

·      Intravenous hydrogen peroxide

o   Intravenous infusion of hydrogen peroxide or h2o2 delivers a positive metabolic effect and may oxidize respective physiological substances by promoting healthful tissue growth and increments cellular oxygen tension, which hinders the growth or development of tumors.

·      Intravenous sodium bicarbonate: True pH “balancing, True Detoxification

o   Oral sodium bicarbonate and intravenous DHA may have the potential to blunt the aggressiveness of certain cancers in which suboptimal intracellular ascorbate levels contribute to elevated HIF-1 activity.

·      Hyperbaric Ambient Air

o   Hyperbaric Oxygen significantly improved the radiation response of R1H tumors. HBO appeared to be more effective than normobaric carbogen, both with regard to tumor oxygenation and response to irradiation.

·      Bioimpedance therapy (BIS)

o   Bioimpedence spectroscopy has shown to be able to detect early onset lymphedema.

o   BIS has significant clinical utility as it can be used to monitor patients with early breast cancer related risk.

o   More systematic surveillance for earlier detection and the potential benefits of physical activity to prevent lymphedema and mitigate symptoms and reduce risk factors.

Healthy blood ranges

·      Integrated work ups

o   One should have regular mammograms in order to monitor activity within the body

o   Vitamin levels such as vitamin A, D, and C should be regulated and this has shown to decrease ones risk.

o   Regular blood work can monitor hormones levels especially those associated with breast cancer risk.

o   Proper checking of the lymphatics for adequate removal of toxins is necessary

NEXT BLOG: Breast Cancer - The Toxins, Treatments & Disease Connection

None of the statements herein have been approved by the FDA (Food & Drug Administration) nor does this information substitute for sound medical or nutritional health advice.

Contact us for a free 15-minute consultation by calling: 914-242-8844.

Breast Cancer - The Toxins, Treatments & Disease Connection: Part V

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Breast Cancer: A Modern Epidemic

Preventive Concepts & Strategies for Optimal Health

By Dr. Michael Wald, Supervisor of Longevity Services at Integrated Medicine of Mt Kisco

495 E. Main Street, Mount Kisco, NY 10549 914-242-8844 /

www.intmedny.com  / www.blooddetective.com

Environmental Chemicals & Breast Cancer That Might Influence Breast Cancer Development & Recovery

 Environmental causes or precipitators of breast cancer development is a neglected area of focus in traditional medicine, but not in the scientific arena. In other words, there is an evidence-base that the environment including foods and chemicals in the air, water and food contribute to breast and degenerative disease development in many people. Below I have outlined some of the basics to consider in this area, but all of my blogs explore this area to some extent - so, read ALL of my five breast cancer blogs.

1.     Most DNA mutations related to breast cancer occur in single breast cells during a woman's life rather than having been inherited. 

2.     85,000 synthetic chemicals on the market today including, but not limited to, preservatives, lipstick, sunscreens, and deodorants, the flame retardants to our sofas, plasticizers in our water bottles, pesticides on our fruits and vegetables, and GMOs.

3.     70% of those with breast cancer have no known risk factors like late menopause, children late in life or family history or genes.

4.     Non-industrialized countries have lower rates of breast cancer compared with industrialized countries; those who move to countries with lower rates experienced lower rates.  Estrogen is linked to development of breast cancer.  Xenoestrogens act like estrogens (weed killers and pesticides, plastic additives or by-products, ingredients in spray paints and paint removers, and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), used in food manufacture and food packaging, medical products, cars, toys, credit cards, appliances, and rainwear.

5.     The burden of environmental chemicals has been underestimated (http://www.bcaction.org/our-take-on-breast-cancer/environment/)

 

What are some simple lifestyle considerations to reduce ones risk include?

·      No smoking and avoidance of second hand smoke and air pollution.

·      Eliminate saturated and trans fats.

·      No alcohol: Alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, increasing linearly even with a moderate consumption and irrespectively of the type of alcoholic beverage.

·      Avoiding Estrogens are known that they may produce breast cancer by actions on estrogen receptors and also as chemical carcinogens, as a consequence of their oxidation leading to reactive metabolites.

·      Avoiding excessive radiation and taking nutritional precautions are associated with a reduction in risks. 

·      Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for cancer such as pancreatic, liver, colorectal and breast cancer. In addition, diabetes decreases the risk of prostate cancer.  Further stressing the importance of diet, exercise, and proper supplementation.

·      Infections (viruses) and breast cancer

o   Human Papilloma virus HPV- High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the causative agent of several cancers especially breast cancer.

o   Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a common herpes virus, has been reported to be a risk factor for many diseases, including malignant diseases such as glioma, neuroblastoma, and breast cancer.

o   Evidence is accumulating that one or more beta-retrovirus is associated with human breast cancer.

Q-What treatments for breast cancer that are in studies now do you see as the new movement for treatment?

·      Intravenous vitamin C (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23916956)

o   Plasma antioxidants are supposed to be directly related to breast cancer risk.

o   Severe α-tocopherol deficiency could increase breast cancer risk. 

·      Intravenous infusions of modest doses of DHA may have potential for optimizing the intracellular ascorbate content of cancers, potentially rendering them less aggressive. 

·      Intravenous hydrogen peroxide

o   Intravenous infusion of hydrogen peroxide or h2o2 delivers a positive metabolic effect and may oxidize respective physiological substances by promoting healthful tissue growth and increments cellular oxygen tension, which hinders the growth or development of tumors.

·      Intravenous sodium bicarbonate: True pH “balancing, True Detoxification

o   Oral sodium bicarbonate and intravenous DHA may have the potential to blunt the aggressiveness of certain cancers in which suboptimal intracellular ascorbate levels contribute to elevated HIF-1 activity.

·      Hyperbaric Ambient Air

o   Hyperbaric Oxygen significantly improved the radiation response of R1H tumors. HBO appeared to be more effective than normobaric carbogen, both with regard to tumor oxygenation and response to irradiation.

·      Bioimpedance therapy (BIS)

o   Bioimpedence spectroscopy has shown to be able to detect early onset lymphedema.

o   BIS has significant clinical utility as it can be used to monitor patients with early breast cancer related risk.

o   More systematic surveillance for earlier detection and the potential benefits of physical activity to prevent lymphedema and mitigate symptoms and reduce risk factors.

Healthy blood ranges

·      Integrated work ups - The Blood Detective way!

o   One should have regular mammograms in order to monitor activity within the body

o   Vitamin levels such as vitamin A, D, and C should be regulated and this has shown to decrease ones risk.

o   Regular blood work can monitor hormones levels especially those associated with breast cancer risk.

o   Proper checking of the lymphatics for adequate removal of toxins is necessary.

- My blood detective workup is a comprehensive blood workup looking for heavy metals, nutritional deficiencies and usage problems, absorption issues and fundamentally looks at many body systems all at once - this approach is not usual in medicine and I believe improves the likelihood of identifying health issues, many unknown to the person, providing the opportunity for deepened prevention and treatment efforts.

None of the statements herein have been approved by the FDA (Food & Drug Administration) nor does this information substitute for sound medical or nutritional health advice.

Contact us for a free 15-minute consultation by calling: 914-242-8844.

 

#GMO Free Lifestyle

mwald

Caryn Hartglass: Hello we are back I’m Caryn Hartglass, you’re listening to It’s All About Food, thank you! So I hope you enjoyed that last half hour I did, sometimes I like to mix it up a little bit and get a little philosophical, a little food for thought there, things to digest, that you don’t normally think about. And now we’re going to talk about nutrition because people can’t ever get enough of it I think, at least people are always asking me questions. So I’m going to bring on my next guest, Dr. Michael Wald, aka the Blood Detective, he is the director of nutrition at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, Dr. Wald has appeared numerous times on Fox 5 news, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 Westchester News, and ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer. He is double board certified in nutrition, is a certified dietitian, nutritionist, a certified nutritional specialist, and a certified clinical nutritionist, he holds a post-graduate degree in chiropractic from the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, a Master’s degree from the University of Bridgeport, and he earned an MD degree from the University of Health Sciences School of Medicine Antigua and was past director of education for the International and American Association of Clinical Nutritionists, the largest nutrition organization in the United States. He’s published over a dozen books, writes regular health articles, lectures across the US and internationally, and has READ MORE OR LISTEN TO THE RADIO SHOW HERE...

http://responsibleeatingandliving.com/?page_id=11527

15 Tips For A Healthier Winter

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Immunity: Too Much of a Good Thing

By Michael Wald, MS, DC, CDN, CNS – Director of Nutrition at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, 914-242-8844 (Ext. 1)

LISTEN TO THIS TOPIC PRESENTED BY DR. MICHAEL WALD - THE BLOOD DETECTIVE

There is little doubt that the immune system if fundamental for our overall health and wellbeing. To begin with, we actually have several immune systems including white blood cells and immunoglobulins. Too much immunity results in tissue breakdown, inflammation and disease.  Too little immunity results in an increased risk of contracting all manner of viruses, bacteria, fungi (yeast) and parasites.  Although not all diseases are caused by immune problems, most health problems result in immune problems - either way, paying careful attention to the immune system can go a long way towards preventing and beating illness and disease. Either way, a little knowledge about the immune system and how it works can reduce your risk of premature disease and early death.  I have personally focused my clinical nutrition practice upon the immune system as the “base” from which I develop individualized health plans.  Below I have provided some of the most common questions and concerns that my patients have asked me about the immune “systems”.

“Dr. Wald, I would like your help to increase my immune system.” This is a common request made by many of my patients. The problem is, the premise behind it is often dead wrong!

Immune Deficiency—Or Excess?

More often than not, health problems are associated with autoimmunity, or too much immunity, rather than immune deficiency, or too little. Too much or too little immunity have much in common. Tissue breakdown involving oxidative stress, inflammation and nutritional issues are common to both extremes of immune imbalance. So how do you tell which immune problem, or combination of problems, you might be suffering from? Yup, you can have both immune deficiency and immune excess simultaneously—further confusing many health-care providers and sufferers alike. The answer is that there is no way, based on symptoms alone, to tell if those particular symptoms are the result of immune suppression or immune excess (autoimmunity).

Symptoms May Not Be What They Seem

Bruising easily, cold sores, constipation, diarrhea, dry eyes and mouth, fatigue, recurrent infections, hair loss, memory loss, feeling cold and poor healing are just a few symptoms of immune imbalance, or “dysfunction,” that require careful questioning, personalized lab tests and trial and error with various natural/nutritional products.

If you do not respond by feeling markedly better when using vitamin C, zinc, echinacea, astragalus, goldenseal, germanium, lysine or other so-called immune boosters, consider that your immune system may not need boosting, but the reverse: immune regulation. The right nutritional program, tailored to your needs, will bring both high and low immune problems back to baseline.

In general however, you can’t go wrong doing the following in preparation for the winter.

  1. Drink plenty of water; your urine should be clear or nearly clear.
  2. Sleep at least nine hours—and it must be restorative sleep.
  3. Eat organic fruits and vegetables, and drink freshly prepared juices.
  4. Take nutritional supplements based on your blood work.
  5. Keep warm in order to reduce stress on the immune system.
  6. Wash your hands frequently to avoid transmission of infectious agents.
  7. Exercise regularly, but don’t overdo it.
  8. Eat only free range animal meats (if you choose to eat meat at all).
  9. Take at least a multivitamin (without iron unless you are found to be anemic on blood testing).
  10. Drink a super-food supplement that contains dozens of fruits and vegetables in 1 or 2 scoops. Almost none of my patients can meet the new guidelines outline by Harvard Medical School stating that we need a minimum of 10 combined pieces of fruits and vegetables per day to lower our disease potential.
  11. Have longevity blood tests performed a few times a year, or as recommended by your longevity practitioner, and tailor all of these suggestions – but more importantly, personalize your diet and nutritional supplements and lifestyle to your exact biochemical (nutritional) needs.
  12. Wash you hands thoroughly.
  13. Do not smoke.
  14. Do not drink alcohol in excess.
  15. Develop powerful coping skills that allow for you to act rationally and “de-fuse” misinterpretations of external events. In other words, rather than have life determine how you behave, choose your behavior in response to your positive interpretations of external life events.

Nutritional Supports for the winter and for immunity in general:

http://www.blooddetective.com/immune-health-new

Dr. Michael Wald is director of nutrition at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco and the author of more than 10 books on health. His newest book, The Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets, is scheduled for release in 2013. Contact him at 914.242.8844, ext. 1, or Info@IntMedNY.com. For more information visitIntMedNY.com.  Twitter DrMichaelWald (BloodDetective).

http://justjoanna.com/2013/01/15-tips-for-a-healthy-winter-from-dr-michael-wald-aka-blood-detective.html

Bounce! Trampoline Sports & Dr. Michael Wald of Integrated Medicine of Mt. Kisco

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Present a Series of Free Healthy Living Workshops Bounce! Trampoline Sports has developed a Have Fun Get Fit program for teens that has proven successful in helping teens eat healthier, exercise more and lose weight. The second session will begin on January 14th. In conjunction with this unique exercise program, Bounce! has teamed up with Dr. Michael Wald of Integrated Medicine of Mt. Kisco to present a series of workshops for both kids and parents regardless of whether they are in the Have Fun Get Fit program or not.

Dr. Wald is a well-recognized health authority, television personality, and author and practicing clinical nutritionist-dietician. He has appeared on numerous shows including News 12 and most recently ABC World News Tonight. Parents will have an opportunity to ask questions about weight loss and overall health and well-being during the sessions which will be led by him and Sunny Seward, Clinical Nutritionist who works with Dr. Wald.

There is no charge for the workshops and they are open to teens as well as adults. For more information visit www.bounceonit.com or call845-268-4000.  All workshops will run from 6:30 – 7:30pm.

Session One: January 14th

We are NOT what we eat! Which diet is best for adults and children?

During this talk Dr. Michael Wald, Clinical Nutritionist-Dietician, will review a variety of diets and healthy eating strategies. How to individualize them and determine the best one for your own health goals will be covered in practical detail.

Session Two: January 21st

Healthy Choices for Breakfast, lunch and dinner

Dr. Michael Wald will outline healthy foods along with recipes for adults and children for overall health, weight loss and keeping weight off forever.

Session Three: January 28

Things Kids Should Know About Their Food Choices

What kids learn when they are young largely determines their health for decades to come. This is your chance to hear Dr. Michael Wald’s solutions to healthy living and eating. This practical talk is meant to motivate, educate and inspire!

Session Four: February 4th

Ten Key Success Strategies to Lose Weight Forever!

Dr. Wald believes that healthy lifestyle strategies need to be easy to follow and enjoyable.  Dr. Wald has counseled thousands of people, adults and children alike, towards successful weight loss and health goals. This talk is loaded with practical ways to motivate young people to grow up into health-minded adults.

Session Five: February 11th

Personalized Health & Weight Loss/Maintenance Solutions

During this talk, Dr. Michael Wald…nicknamed the “Blood Detective” will teach you exactly what blood and other tests to ask your doctor for to get to the bottom of persistent weight problems. Diabetes, heart disease, growth issues, neurodevelopmental and learning issues may be made worse by poor diet. Lab work can help uncover hidden clues that can be used to create a simple, effective diet and lifestyle solution.

Head Fitness Trainer at Bounce! Trampoline Sports and former professional acrobat Victor Byrne, leads each Have Fun Get Fit class and has developed unique activities such as long jump into the foam pit, slam dunk basketball contests, jumping rope on the trampoline and even working with hula hoops on the trampoline. The class meets three times a week for one hour beginning January 14th 2013 and runs for eight weeks. For additional details and information check the Bounce website (www.bounceonit.com).

Bounce! Trampoline Sports is a 25,000 square foot facility offering all ages the opportunity to play sports, have fun and get fit on enormous courts of interconnected trampolines. They offer aerobics and acrobat classes, Bounce! Boot Camp, pick up dodgeball games and league play, slam dunk basketball, and gymnastics and acrobat training. For more details visit their website atwww.bounceonit.com. Bounce! Trampoline Sports is located at 612 Corporate Way in Valley Cottage off Route 303, just two miles north of the Palisades Center Mall. For questions call 845-268-4000.

How to Foster Success with Weight Loss or any new Healthy Habit

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By: Dr. Michael Wald – Clinical Nutritionist

495 E. Main Street, Mount Kisco, NY 10549

914-242-8844 (Ext. 1)

www.intmedny.com/www.blooddetective.com

1. Commit to Thirty Days – Three to four weeks is all the time you need to make a habit automatic. If you can make it through the initial conditioning phase, it becomes much easier to sustain. A month is a good block of time to commit to a change since it easily fits in your calendar.  It is essential that one makes a conscious decision to commit to the new health habit.

2. Make it Daily – Consistency is critical if you want to make a habit stick. If you want to start exercising, go to the gym every day for your first thirty days. Going a couple times a week will make it harder to form the habit. Activities you do once every few days are trickier to lock in as habits. It is therefore important to structure one’s environment for success; doing this fosters more consistent daily habits.

3. Start Simple – Don’t try to completely change your life in one day. It is easy to get over-motivated and take on too much. If you wanted to study two hours a day, first make the habit to go for thirty minutes and build on that. Start somewhere, but be consistent and set up your environment to support your goals.

4. Remind Yourself – Around two weeks into your commitment it can be easy to forget. Place reminders to execute your habit each day or you might miss a few days. If you miss time it defeats the purpose of setting a habit to begin with.  Having reminders is a great way to develop consistency…eventually the reminders will likely not be needed.

5. Stay Consistent – The more consistent your habit the easier it will be to stick. If you want to start exercising, try going at the same time, to the same place for your thirty days. When cues like time of day, place and circumstances are the same in each case it is easier to stick.

6. Get a Buddy – Find someone who will go along with you and keep you motivated if you feel like quitting.

7. Form a Trigger – A trigger is a ritual you use right before executing your habit. If you wanted to wake up earlier, this could mean waking up in exactly the same way each morning. If you wanted to quit smoking you could practice snapping your fingers each time you felt the urge to pick up a cigarette.

8. Replace Lost Needs - If you are giving up something in your habit, make sure you are adequately replacing any needs you’ve lost. If watching television gave you a way to relax, you could take up meditation or reading as a way to replace that same need.

9. Be Imperfect – Don’t expect all your attempts to change habits to be successful immediately. It took me four independent tries before I started exercising regularly. Now I love it. Try your best, but expect a few bumps along the way.

10. Use “But” – A prominent habit changing therapist once told me this great technique for changing bad thought patterns. When you start to think negative thoughts, use the word “but” to interrupt it. “I’m no good at this, but, if I work at it I might get better later.”

11. Remove Temptation - Restructure your environment so it won’t tempt you in the first thirty days. Remove junk food from your house, cancel your cable subscription, throw out the cigarettes so you won’t need to struggle with willpower later.

12. Associate With Role Models - Spend more time with people who model the habits you want to mirror. A recent study found that having an obese friend indicated you were more likely to become fat. You become what you spend time around.

13. Run it as an Experiment - Withhold judgment until after a month has past and use it as an experiment in behavior. Experiments can’t fail, they just have different results so it will give you a different perspective on changing your habit.

14. Swish - A technique from NLP. Visualize yourself performing the bad habit. Next visualize yourself pushing aside the bad habit and performing an alternative. Finally, end that sequence with an image of yourself in a highly positive state. See yourself picking up the cigarette, see yourself putting it down and snapping your fingers, finally visualize yourself running and breathing free. Do it a few times until you automatically go through the pattern before executing the old habit.

15. Write it Down – A piece of paper with a resolution on it isn’t that important. Writing that resolution is. Writing makes your ideas more clear and focuses you on your end result.

16. Know the Benefits - Familiarize yourself with the benefits of making a change. Get books that show the benefits of regular exercise. Notice any changes in energy levels after you take on a new diet. Imagine getting better grades after improving your study habits.

17. Know the Pain – You should also be aware of the consequences. Exposing yourself to realistic information about the downsides of not making a change will give you added motivation.

18. Do it For Yourself - Don’t worry about all the things you “should” have as habits. Instead tool your habits towards your goals and the things that motivate you. Weak guilt and empty resolutions aren’t enough.

 

Dr. Michael Wald, aka, The Blood Detective’s Top 10 Lab Test Picks for Children

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1.     Vitamin D, B12, C – energy, tissue repair, cancer, diabetes and heart disease risk More information:

http://www.healthychild.com/vitamin-d-levels

http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/vitamin-b12-deficiency-anemia-exams-and-tests

http://www.livestrong.com/vitamin-c/

2.     Blood lipids – measures total cholesterol, HDL (good cholesterol), LDL (bad cholesterol), and Triglycerides

More information: http://kidshealth.org/parent/system/medical/blood_test_lipid_panel.html

3.     Chemistry – levels of: iron, sodium, potassium, creatinine, glucose, etc.

More information: http://kidshealth.org/parent/general/sick/labtest5.html

4.     Homocysteine – energy, inflammation, immunity and future risk of many diseases.

More information: http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/23/9/1348.full.pdf

5.     CRP—indicates inflammation, cancer, heart disease, diabetes, etc. indicator

More information: http://kidshealth.org/parent/system/medical/test_crp.html

6.     HgA1c Diabetes screen – blood sugar control/diabetes

More information: http://www.cpnonline.org/CRS/CRS/pa_hemoa1c_pep.htm

7.     Ferritin level – evaluates iron level in the blood – iron overload/inflammation

More information: http://kidshealth.org/parent/system/medical/test_ferritin.html

8.   Gluten intolerance antibody test – for those with strange health problems and gut issues

More information:  http://glutenintoleranceschool.com/gluten-intolerance-in-children/

9.   Body composition testing – percentage of body fat, water, muscle & metabolic rate

More information: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2082845/

10.  TSH – free T3 and T4 – metabolic rate, weight, thyroid hormone problems

More information: http://kidshealth.org/parent/system/medical/test_tsh.html

Dr. Michael Wald’s list of 30 Ways for Kids To Lose Weight

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1.     Identify and address psychological issues associated with eating too often and/or too much. 
  • Overweight adolescents are more likely than normal-weight children to be victims of bullying, or be bullies themselves
  • Adolescents are extremely reliant on peers for social support, identity and self-esteem
  • Being overweight isolates them from peers
  • Depression, anxiety, and obsessive compulsive disorder can also occur

For more information:

http://www.livescience.com/6126-childhood-obesity-takes-psychological-toll.html

2.     Get good sleep.

  • Sleep allows their bodies to rest for the following day and is important for brain function, growth, and the immune system
  • When the body doesn’t have enough hours to rest, many things can happen:
    • Feel tired or cranky
    • Unable to think clearly
    • Hard time following directions
    • Tasks that are normally easy seem hard

For more information on ways to help kids get proper sleep:

http://children.webmd.com/features/7-ways-combat-kids-sleep-problems

 

3.     Be realistic about weight loss goals as weight loss does not happen overnight and weight loss efforts vary considerably among children and adults.

  • Setting unrealistic goals may lead to frustration, and frustration may lead to giving up on goals all together
  • Make a comprehensive plan that is gradual and easy to follow so that they feel accomplished!

 

4.     Use music for motivation during exercise or to precipitate exercise.

  • Exercising to music they like will make it more fun and they will be more likely to participate

5.     Consider keeping a food and calorie log.

  • This will make you, and them, more aware of what they are eating, and how much

 

6.     Get friends and family members to join your exercise and healthy eating efforts.

10 Ways to exercise as a family:

http://www.parents.com/fun/sports/exercise/10-ways-to-exercise-as-a-family/

7.     Try and sweat a lot during exercise.

 

8.     Exercise for 15-minute intervals each day.

More information on getting your kid moving—the importance of exercise:

http://www.getkidsinaction.org/exercise/

 

9.     Drink water before all meals.

  • Doing this helps fill the stomach, making them less hungry

 

10.   Don’t skip meals.

  • Breakfast, lunch, and dinner are IMPORTANT

11.   Do not NOT eat!

12.   Kids should not attempt adult weight loss programs.

13.   Eliminate all soda

14.   Eliminate all of the fruit juice

15.   Switch from regular milk to fat free or 1-2% as a beverage or in cooking

16.   Chew food thoroughly

17.   Serve food on a smaller plate

18.   Do not eat fried foods. 

  • Eat baked and broiled foods instead

19.   Replace refined carbohydrates with non-refined carbohydrates

20.   Make a chart and reward your children for specific goals.

  • Use a star chart with small rewards

21.   Have your children drink lots of water as it promotes weight loss.

22.   Remove all unhealthy foods from the house.

23.   Encourage children to eat fruit as in-between snacks.

24.   Cook healthy meals with your children

For more information on Healthy Eating: Kids Recipes:

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_eating_kids

25.   Avoid eating anything within 2 hrs of bedtime

  • This will contribute more to weight gain as calories are burned more slowly in the evening.

26.   Play at Bounce on a regular basis.

27.   Children should eat smaller portions of unhealthy foods (but not as a reward)

 

28.   Find another sport that your child likes.

  • Vary their activities for better results

29.   Have your child do push-ups and sit ups everyday.

30.  Create an exercise schedule that is reasonable for your child.

More information on Kid Exercises:

http://fit.webmd.com/kids/move/article/exercise-types

To schedule a weight loss appointment for you or your child please call Dr. Michael Wald at: 914-242-8844 (Ext. 1). Also visit: www.intmedny.com and www.blooddetective.com for more articles on health and weight loss.


 

Why You Need a Nutritional Interpretation of Your Blood Work

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Below you will find a letter that we provide our patients that explains why nutritional interpretation of blood work is needed. Our office has recommended that you allow us to draw blood for the purpose of careful medical and nutritional interpretation.  This letter is meant to provide you with further details regarding the benefits of this combined comparison, and elucidate nutritional and medical problems often missed during routine blood interpretation .  What is uncovered is often valuable for managing health problems where standard medical interventions have fallen short.

Please be advised that we offer two types of blood interpretation:  Medical Interpretation and Nutritional Interpretation.

Medical Blood Interpretation

This type of interpretation is the most common and involves the doctor ordering blood work and examining which blood results, if any, fall within the abnormal column.  Traditional medical interpretation of blood work is disease-oriented and seeks to identify obvious abnormalities to diagnose disease conditions.

This means that doctors who have extensive training in diagnosing obvious diseases will examine blood work for the most extreme abnormalities that fall outside of the various ranges given on a blood test.  For example, a normal cholesterol range is 0-200.  If your cholesterol level is 199 for example, you may be told that your blood work is normal; and by strict definition it is normal (meaning average…but not necessarily healthy or desirable.) Finally, if you desire to know if you have a grave condition looking for blood results that fall either on the low or high end of the blood ranges is appropriate.

The problem with strict medical interpretation is that it does not identify a problem until it there is a full-blown abnormality. Many people, if not most, have persistent chronic conditions or symptoms and have been told their blood work is normal.  This is because the blood work performed was either not detailed enough and/or it has been interpolated only from a disease perspective and not also from a preventive, early detection of dysfunction perspective.

Nutritional Blood Interpretation

Standard medical blood laboratory ranges (high and low values) are essentially based on a sampling of three population groups:  blood donors, employees of corporations and hospital personnel. These “normal”  ranges represent the average unhealthy American, not ideal ranges that represent health.  For example, one must lose between 40%-80% of their kidney function before kidney tests reveal that anything is wrong.  Similarly, approximately 40% of thyroid function must be lost before blood tests show anything.   Ask yourself, “Would I rather have my blood results compared to an average population or a healthier population?”  Because our goal is to help predict and prevent health problems, we perform nutritional blood interpretation in addition to medical interpretation of each patient’s blood work.

Our office uses narrower ranges of blood values that represent values found in healthier individuals.  For example, evidence suggests that cholesterol levels between 160 and 180 are more ideal than 0-200.  We believe that tighter ranges are more appropriate for virtually all blood tests.  We refer to these tighter ranges as healthy or functional ranges.  When considered along with other information such as medical history and other testing, these ranges often allow us to find problems not apparent when looking at disease ranges (traditional blood values).  Think of it this way, if one wants to see “something coming” then using values that are tighter on the low and the high ranges would appear abnormal long before they would when compared to blood ranges that are very wide on the high and low side.

In conjunction with your health history and medical examination, nutritional interpretation of blood work is important for determining the most appropriate nutritional recommendations.  Please expect that we will recommend this type of interpretation to you each time we ask you to provide blood samples. If one wishes to find answers to chronic problems then one must considering asking different questions – this is precisely what the nutritional interpretation of blood work provides…different questions and different answers.

Thank you for trusting us and for allowing us the opportunity to go beyond the basics.

Healthy Diet Basics and Unhealthy Food

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1. Increase the amount of whole, unprocessed foods in your diet (fresh fruit, vegetables, whole grains, beans, raw nuts and seeds), relative to the amount of processed foods you consume (pasta, bread, packaged foods). Suggestion: Switch from white bread to whole wheat or multigrain.

2. Diversify your diet by including new and different foods in your diet each week.  Rotate the foods you eat so that you do not consume a given food every day.  The foods should not be processed, fried or contain added sugars and preservatives.

Suggestion: At the very least, eat one or two new and healthy foods per week and increase from there. Focus on adding new foods as opposed to removing everything that you currently eat. Overtime your diet will transform for the better!

3. A fat free diet is not healthy!  Fat should constitute 20-30% of your total diet generally speaking.  Limit saturated fats (fast found in animal products) to less than 10% of your daily diet.  Avoid fried foods, hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils and cottonseed oil (read the label).  Healthy oils to consume include:  unsaturated essential omega 3, omega 6 and omega 9 fatty acids found in flax seed oil and seeds, olive oil (cold pressed, virgin, imported and in a tin to protect from light), canola oil, salmon, cod, tuna, mackerel, currants, raw nuts and seeds (roasting the nuts and seeds saturates the oils in them and this is not at all healthy).  Store oils and nuts/seeds in the refrigerator.  Roasted nuts and seeds contain saturated fats that put on weight and increase your risk of heart disease, cancer and other degenerative conditions.

Suggestion: Eat avocados, use fresh olive oil in salads and cooking, eat raw nuts and seeds. Eat baked or broiled salmon

4.      Eat a high fiber diet by consuming a lot of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, nuts, and seeds, and minimizing your intake of meats and refined foods (i.e., desserts, table sugar, candy).

Suggestion: Exchange meats for chicken, turkey and fish.  Limit fish to no more than once per week or less if you are overweight and has hypercholesteremia (high blood fats).

5.      Ensure you eat sufficient protein each day (about 15-20% of your diet).  Good protein sources include lean meats, poultry, fish, eggs, soy products, beans, low-fat dairy products, nuts and food combining of grains/beans/vegetables.

6.      Decrease or eliminate refined and processed sugars from your diet.  As a substitute, use natural, unprocessed sugars high in the vitamins and minerals needed to help digest them, including 100% pure maple syrup, fruit-only jams, fresh fruit, honey, molasses, barley malt, brown rice syrup and carob.

Suggestions: Not all sugar is the same. Sugar found in most desserts and table sugar (sucrose) is called simple sugar; simple sugar consumption (even in small amounts) is known to cause inflammation in the body, increase blood fats, promote weight gain, reduce ability to loose weight and increase your risk of developing these and other diseases: diabetes, heart and vessel disease, hypertention, cancers, autoimmune disease, chronic fatigue, etc.

7.     When you eat healthy carbohydrates do not eat them alone.  Instead, add proteins to all of your meals and snacks.

Suggestion: Protein will slow down the absorption of carbohydrates helping to level out blood sugar. Fluxuations in blood sugar can cause attention deficit, fatigue, slow metabolism and increase disease risk.

8.     Add sea salt to your regular diet to help keep your adrenal glands in shape.

9.      Drink plenty of water each day (body weight divided by 2, multiplied by 0.8 is the number of ounces your body needs, more if you are exercising).  Avoid caffeinated and carbonated beverages; caffeine is a diuretic (loss of fluids and minerals) and carbonated soft drinks leach calcium from bones).  Herbal teas, fresh vegetables and fruit juices are healthy to consume.  Diluted bottled juices and naturally decaffeinated beverages are OK in moderation.

10.     Eat several small meals throughout the day instead of two or three large meals.  Smaller meals spaced fairly evenly throughout the day help balance blood sugar levels and each the stress of digestion.

11.     Chew your food thoroughly.  Chewing signals the “feeding centers” and “satiety” centers in your brain telling you when you are full so you do not overeat.  Chewing also aids the digestive process starting in the mouth and signals the rest of the gastrointestinal tract to “get ready” food is on the way.

12.     Consider not drinking fluids of any kind with your meals or at least sipping fluids as opposed to gulping them down in large volumes.  Fluids can dilute digestive juices impairing optimal digestion of foods.

13.     Do not eat when you are stressed or on the run.  Proper digestion involves activated a part of your nervous and digestive system which is active during a more relaxed state (i.e., like during a meal).  A different part of the nervous system is activated when you are up-and-around which is not conducive to optimal digestion of foods.

14,   Eat every two hours.  Small meals consumed throughout the course of the day balances blood sugar. Problems with blood sugar promote weight gain, diabetes and cardiovascular risk and other health problems.

15.     Supplement a healthy diet with a good quality multi-vitamin/mineral complex and other nutrients indicated by your individual health needs

Suggestion: Have nutritional and medical laboratory work performed to find out more exactly the nutrition that you require as an individual.  See: www.intmedny.com for more information.

PLEASE CONSIDER THESE SUGGESTIONS AS FUNDAMENTAL TO YOUR OVERALL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING.  MORE SPECIFIC RECOMMENDATIONS WILL BE GIVEN TO YOU THROUGHOUT THE COURSE OF OUR WORK TOGETHER.  THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT TO BE USED IN PLACE OF SOUND MEDICAL AND NUTRITIONAL ADVICE.

Why Take Nutritional Supplements?

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  • The average American consumes below the RDI/RDV (Recommended Daily Intakes and Values) values of several important nutrients.  Nutritional deficiencies are very common and contribute to many varied diseases and compromised quality of life.
  • The RDI/RDV values represent the lowest levels of nutrients required to prevent deficiency in a certain segment of the population.  These values DO NOT represent IDEAL levels of nutrition – just the minimum not to prevent a deficiency disease!
  • Optimal health generally requires higher amounts of nutrients (optimal amounts).  A high quality diet is necessary, a multivitamin and sometimes other nutrients depending upon your age, your level of health, genetics and other factors.
  • Thousands of scientific studies have demonstrated that many common degenerative diseases can be prevented with optimal levels of nutrition.  YOU ARE NOT WHAT YOU EAT! You are what you absorb what you eat! Many people do not absorb nutrition from there foods and do not know it until it is too late.
  • You would have to consume large quantities of foods to make up for some nutritional inadequacies that nutritional supplements can correct.  A nutritional blood test and consultation with a clinical nutritionist can help!
  • Nutritional supplements provide concentrated amounts of nutrients that even very large amounts of foods cannot meet.  Thousands of scientific studies have proved the value of nutritional supplements based on individual health needs and goals.
  • Nutritional supplements provide reliable amounts of nutrients.  A balance of healthy foods and nutritional supplements may be the ideal way to go for some people.
  • For long-standing and acute problems nutritional supplements provide the potential for faster results than foods alone often can.
  • Certain dosages of supplements are meant for meeting one’s daily nutritional needs along with diet.  Other supplement dosages may be necessary for certain health problems.  You have unique nutritional requirements that can be determined by a qualified clinical nutritionist and sometimes blood tests.
  •  Higher dosages of supplements may allow one to “catch-up” with, and reverse, years of nutritional deficiency and health problems resulting from them.
  • Nutritional supplementation can allow the practitioner to determine which nutrients are most important for your health problem(s); one can isolate single nutrients with supplements, but not from the diet.
  • Optimal nutrition from foods, and use of nutritional supplements, can help many medical problems and work together with medical treatments. A well-nourished person heals better!
  • If you feel that you cannot adjust your dietary intake and lifestyle appropriately, nutritional supplementation may help promote health in spite of these difficulties.
  • Supplements provide a convenient way to improve and increase the nutritional content of your diet.  Sometimes it is easier to take a calcium, iron or vitamin C pill than to eat an extra serving of turnips (for calcium), dark green leafy vegetables (for iron) and fruits & vegetables (for more vitamin C). Foods are fundamental, but you require more than you can consume in a reasonable diet consider appropriate nutritional supplements.
  •  Not all nutritional supplements are alike, and you have been prescribed specific dosages and forms of nutritional supplements.  Always use nutritional supplements that are recommended by a trained health professional. Pharmaceutical grade nutrients are almost always better than most store-purchased nutritional supplements.
  • Do not add other supplements unless approved by your health care provider.  Changing your supplement “recipe” is similar to changing your prescription medication; unintended effects or no effects may result.

 

This information is for educational purposes only and is not to be used in place of sound medical and nutritional health advice provided by a qualified health care provider.

 

Food for Healthy Packed Lunches

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Dr. Michael Wald, Board Certified Nutritionist, Certified Dietician Nutritionist. Director of Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, P.C / 914-242-8844 (Ext. 1) / www.intmedny.com / www.bloodDetective.com

Around half of all children take their lunch to school – that’s 5.5 billion packed lunches every year. Unfortunately, many of them are unhealthy!

According to a Food Standard’s Agency study, nine out of 10 packed lunches contain foods high in sugar, salt and saturates and fewer than half contain fruit. Here’s how to pack a nutritious lunch for your kids…

  • Use wholegrain or whole meal bread, rolls and pitta and try ciabatta, mini baguettes, bagels and raisin or sun dried tomato bread for variety
  • Pack pasta or rice salads instead of sandwiches from time to time
  • Cut fat by using less butter, spread or mayo in sandwiches and choose low-fat fillings like lean ham, turkey, chicken, tuna in water, cottage cheese, Edam or banana
  • Add two portions of fruit – don’t just stick to apples and pears, though. For variety, add grapes, fruit salad, a slice of melon, a small box of raisins or a can of fruit in juice
  • Include cherry tomatoes, carrot and pepper sticks and add salad to sarnies
  • In the winter, fill a flask with vegetable, tomato or carrot soup – or even a casserole or stew.
  • Replace cakes, biscuits and chocolate with scones, fruit bread or low-sugar cereal bars (check the labels)
  • Swap fizzy drinks for water, unsweetened fruit juice, fruit smoothies, cartons of semi-skimmed milk or unsweetened yogurt drinks.

Healthy Snacks for Children and Teenagers

  • Fresh fruit – chop it into bite-sized pieces for young children to make it easier to eat or buy packs of ready-prepared fresh fruit slices or chunks
  • Mini boxes of dried fruit such as raisins or small packs of apricots or mixed fruit
  • Small packs of chocolate-covered raisins or nuts (avoid giving nuts to young children because of the risk of choking)
  • Chopped up vegetables such as carrot, celery and pepper sticks and cherry tomatoes with a favorite dip (look for those low in salt and fat if you’re buying ready-made dips)
  • Fresh popcorn made without salt or sugar
  • Whole meal toast with peanut butter and banana or low-fat soft cheese and tomato
  • Fruit smoothie
  • Unsweetened yogurt drinks or a pot of low-fat fruit yogurt or fromage frais
  • High-fiber cereal with semi-skimmed milk
  • Whole meal sandwiches filled with lean meat, chicken, tuna in water, cheese or egg and salad.
  • Small packets of unsalted nuts and seeds – try mixing with dried fruit.