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At Integrated Nutrition of Mount Kisco, PLLC and Blood Logic, Inc. we work in close partnership with you towards developing your natural healing plan. What you do not need is a generalized “one size fits all approach.”  Our approach for clarifying your health issues, finding hidden causes of your health problem(s) and developing natural solutions has been woven into our carefully designed longevity approach that we call The Blood Detective’s Longevity Plan. We believe that developing a Metabolic Map of your entire body by performing specialized health tests (e.g., biomarkers) is a truly holistic way of viewing, appreciating and managing your health concerns. As a concierge practice, we make ourselves truly available to you.  As a paperless office we are concerned about the world environment as it affects our “internal environment”…namely, your health.

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Weight loss, poor memory, intestinal issues, hormone problems, pain, fatigue, muscle aches and pains…whatever your health concerns(s), Dr. Michael Wald, The BloodDDetective has the answers…naturally. The Blooddetective blog is filled with dozens of radio shows on just about every health topic that you can think of. “Ask The Blooddetective is Dr. Wald’s weekly radio show covering nutrition and naturopatic, dietary and exercise, disease and health topics.

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Probiotics - Advanced Concepts, Uses and Benefits

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A bug by any other name…. Why Use Probiotics?

Dr. Michael Wald - Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, P.C

914-242-8844 - www.intmedny.com

The use of probiotics as bio-therapeutic agents is commonplace in the US and around much of the world. Probiotics are typically delivered in relatively low-dose functional foods (primarily yogurts) providing a few billion colony forming units (CFU) or less; or in modest doses, in the form of dietary supplements of 5-25 billion CFU. It is simply not enough to take a “good thing” like probiotics if the dosages are useless!  Most of my patients seem completely unaware o the differences between one brand, type or strength of probiotic products.  In my clinical opinion and experience, I can tell you that the dosages that most people take are simply too low to make a real difference.  This is why I have produced Re-Inoculate (a term that means “putting it back) – a powered product that contains 240 billion organisms per dose…more than 10X more potent than any other product that I am aware of on the market.

Over the past several years, an emerging trend has witnessed much higher doses of probiotics being used in clinical practice and research.

The initial focus of the clinical research on high-dose probiotics has been primarily on functional GI disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). These conditions represent extreme examples of dysbiosis and dysfunction within the mucosal immune system of the gut; a system which is integrally associated with the microflora of the gut lumen.

It is essential to keep in mind that probiotics are best used in combination with other supplements and certain foods that help maximize health benefits.

Probiotics have many other uses beyond helping gastrointestinal problems. Here is a partial list:

  • Lowers cholesterol
  • Offsets adverse side effects of antibiotics
  • Immunomodulation
  • Reduces inflammation
  • Helps diabetes
  • May reduce depression
  • Reduces colon cancer risk
  • Useful in a large number of cancers
  • Colitis
  • Procitis
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • Reduces risk of acquired infection
  • Helps treat active infection
  • Helps prevent harmful bacteria translocation (traveling) form the colon to other parts of the body
  • Produces B-vitamins and vitamin K in the colon
  • And much more!

Research Findings

Strategies of mucosal immunotherapy for allergic diseases.

Ye YL, Chuang YH, Chiang BL.

Cell Mol Immunol. 2011 Jun 13. doi: 10.1038/cmi.2011.17. [Epub ahead of print]

 

Are bacteriocins underexploited? Novel applications for old antimicrobials.

Montalbán-López M, Sánchez-Hidalgo M, Valdivia E, Martínez-Bueno M, Maqueda M.

Curr Pharm Biotechnol. 2011 Aug;12(8):1205-20.

 

Nutrition considerations surrounding restorative proctocolectomy.

Buckman SA, Heise CP.

Nutr Clin Pract. 2010 Jun;25(3):250-6. Review.

 

Probiotic yeasts: anti-inflammatory potential of various non-pathogenic strains in experimental colitis in mice.

Foligné B, Dewulf J, Vandekerckove P, Pignède G, Pot B.

World J Gastroenterol. 2010 May 7;16(17):2134-45.

 

Probiotics: preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

Jones K.

J Spec Pediatr Nurs. 2010 Apr;15(2):160-2.

 

Scuticociliatosis and its recent prophylactic measures in aquaculture with special reference to South Korea Taxonomy, diversity and diagnosis of scuticociliatosis: Part I Control strategies of scuticociliatosis: Part II.

Harikrishnan R, Balasundaram C, Heo MS.

Fish Shellfish Immunol. 2010 Jul;29(1):15-31. Epub 2010 Mar 6. Review.

 

Probiotics.

Williams NT.

Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2010 Mar 15;67(6):449-58. Review.

 

Use of oil bodies and oleosins in recombinant protein production and other biotechnological applications.

Bhatla SC, Kaushik V, Yadav MK.

Biotechnol Adv. 2010 May-Jun;28(3):293-300. Epub 2010 Jan 11. Review.

Inulin-type prebiotics--a review: part 1.

Kelly G.

Altern Med Rev. 2008 Dec;13(4):315-29. Review.

 

Lactobacillus crispatus M247-derived H2O2 acts as a signal transducing molecule activating peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma in the intestinal mucosa.

Voltan S, Martines D, Elli M, Brun P, Longo S, Porzionato A, Macchi V, D'Incà R, Scarpa M, Palù G, Sturniolo GC, Morelli L, Castagliuolo I.

Gastroenterology. 2008 Oct;135(4):1216-27. Epub 2008 Jul 9.

 

Probiotics: from functional foods to pharmaceutical products.

Bansal T, Garg S.

Curr Pharm Biotechnol. 2008 Aug;9(4):267-87.

 

Interactions between Staphylococcus aureus and lactic acid bacteria: an old story with new perspectives.

Charlier C, Cretenet M, Even S, Le Loir Y.

Int J Food Microbiol. 2009 Apr 30;131(1):30-9. Epub 2008 Jul 4. Review.

 

Pharmacologic treatment of constipation: what is new?

Pohl D, Tutuian R, Fried M.

Curr Opin Pharmacol. 2008 Dec;8(6):724-8. Epub 2008 Aug 20. Review.

 

Probiotics: overview of microbiological and immunological characteristics.

Blandino G, Fazio D, Di Marco R.

Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2008 Aug;6(4):497-508.

 

Effects of orally administered probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici on the small and large intestine of weaning piglets. A qualitative and quantitative micro-anatomical study.

Di Giancamillo A, Vitari F, Savoini G, Bontempo V, Bersani C, Dell'Orto V, Domeneghini C.

Histol Histopathol. 2008 Jun;23(6):651-64.

 

Probiotics as drugs against human gastrointestinal infections.

Sanz Y, Nadal I, Sánchez E.

Recent Pat Antiinfect Drug Discov. 2007 Jun;2(2):148-56. Review.

 

Additional Evidence of Efficacy

Lactobacillus acidophilus (La-14): 1

• In vitro studies show L. acidophilus La-14 is very resistant to low pH conditions and survives the presence of bile at

concentrations present in the duodenum.

• L. acidophilus La-14 has demonstrated excellent adhesion to human epithelial cell lines applied in in vitro studies, an indicator

of its potential to attach to the intestinal mucosa.

• In vitro studies show that L. acidophilus La-14 inhibited S. typhimurium, S. aureus, E. coli, and L. monocytogenes.

• In humans, an accumulation of oxalic acid can result in a number of conditions including hyperoxaluria, kidney stones and

renal failure. The oxalate-degrading activity of L. acidophilus La-14 was found to be 100%, which was as high as the control

Oxalobacter formigenes DSM, a well known probiotic with oxalate-degrading activity.

• In mice with antibiotic associated diarrhea, L. acidophilus La-14 was able to increase Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium and

decrease the amount of E. coli and Enterococcus.

• An in vitro study showed L. acidophilus La-14 was able to induce IL-12.

• In humans, L. acidophilus La-14 was shown to induce specific IgA and IgG faster and higher than in the control group of those

who had received an oral vaccination.

• L.acidophilus La-14 is resistant to many common antibiotics.

Bifi dobacterium bifi dum (Bb-02): 2

• In vitro studies show B. bifidum Bb-02 is very resistant to low pH conditions and survives the presence of bile at concentrations

present in the duodenum.

• B. bifidum Bb-02 has demonstrated excellent adhesion to human epithelial cell lines applied in in vitro studies, an indicator of

its potential to attach to the intestinal mucosa.

• In vitro studies show that B. bifidum Bb-02 inhibited S. typhimurium, S. aureus, E. coli, and L. monocytogenes.

• B. bifidum Bb-02 is resistant to many common antibiotics.

Bifi dobacterium lactis (BI-04): 3

• In vitro studies show B. lactis BI-04 is extremely resistant to low pH conditions and survives the presence of bile at the

concentrations present in the duodenum.

• B. lactis BI-04 has demonstrated excellent adhesion to human epithelial cell lines applied in in vitro studies, an indicator of its

potential to attach to the intestinal mucosa.

• In vitro studies show B. lactis BI-04 is able to induce IL-10 and IL-12, indicating a strong anti-inflammatory property.

• In a mouse model of colitis, B. lactis BI-04 was able to provide anti-inflammatory benefits, confirming its ability to contribute to

a balanced immune system.

• In humans, B. lactis BI-04 was shown to induce specific IgG faster and higher than in the control group of those who had

received an oral vaccination.

• B. lactis BI-04 is resistant to many common antibiotics.

Lactobacillus plantarum (Lp-115): 4

• L. plantarum is found naturally in most latic acid fermented plant based foods including brined olives, sauerkraut and kimchi.

• In vitro studies show L. plantarum Lp-115 is extremely resistant to low pH conditions and survives the presence of bile at

concentrations present in the duodenum.

• L. plantarum Lp-115 has demonstrated excellent adhesion to human epithelial cell lines applied in in vitro studies, an indicator

of its potential to attach to the intestinal mucosa.

• In vitro studies show that L. plantarum Lp-115 inhibited S. typhimurium, S. aureus, E. coli, and L. monocytogenes.

• In humans, an accumulation of oxalic acid can result in a number of conditions including hyperoxaluria, kidney stones and

renal failure. The oxalate-degrading activity of L. plantarum Lp-115 was found to be 40%.

• In vitro studies show L. plantarum Lp-115 is able to induce moderate amounts of IL-10 and significant amounts of IL-12,

indicating a strong anti-inflammatory property.

• In an animal model of intestinal inflammation, L. plantarum Lp-115 reduced inflammation, displaying a capacity to interact with

the mucosal immune response.

• In humans, L. plantarum Lp-115 was shown to induce IgG faster than in the control group of those who had received an oral

vaccination.

• L. plantarum Lp-115 is resistant to many common antibiotics.

Lactobacillus salivarius (Ls-33): 5

• In vitro studies show L. salivarius Ls-33 is very resistant to low pH conditions and survives the presence of bile at concentrations

present in the duodenum.

• L. salivarius Ls-33 has demonstrated excellent adhesion to human epithelial cell lines applied in in vitro studies, an indicator of

its potential to attach to the intestinal mucosa.

• In vitro studies show that L. salivarisu Ls-33 inhibited S. typhimurium, S. aureus, E. coli, and L. monocytogenes.

• In vitro studies show L. salivarius Ls-33 is able to induce IL-10 and IL-12, indicating a strong anti-inflammatory property.

• In mice L. salivarius Ls-33 led to significant reductions in colitis symptoms and exerted significant protection against intestinal

inflammation, demonstrating its ability to interact with and balance the intestinal mucosal immune response.

• L. salivarius Ls-33 is resistant to many common antibiotics.

Lactobacillus casei (Lc-11): 6

• L. casei is found naturally in fermented vegetables, milk and meat. This strain is commonly used as a starter strain in many

fermented food products.

• In vitro studies show L. casei Lc-11 is very resistant to low pH conditions and survives the presence of bile at the concentrations

present in the duodenum.

• L. casei Lc-11 has demonstrated excellent adhesion to human epithelial cell lines applied in in vitro studies, an indicator of its

potential to attach to the intestinal mucosa.

• In vitro studies show that L. casei Lc-11 inhibited S. typhimurium, S. aureus, E. coli, and L. monocytogenes.

• L. casei Lc-11 is resistant to many common antibiotics.

 

Contraindications, Adverse or Other reactions:

Probiotics are considered very safe with no known adverse affects. Some changes in the stool may be noted and occasionally some people notice a temporary increase in digestive gas.  However, probiotics produce vitamin K in the colon; if an individual is on Coumadin or warfarin then I would not have them suddenly add a large amount (or any probiotics) necessarily. If the individual has already been taking probiotics prior to beginning the anticoagulants above then this is considered ok.

Probiotics – The answer to your high cholesterol, weight gain and more!

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By Dr. Michael Wald Probiotics – The answer to your high cholesterol, weight gain and more!

The term probiotic refers to the use of certain types of “healthy bugs (either bacterial or fungal in origin) that the body needs in certain amounts and in different places in the body to carry on literally hundreds of essential functions of life.  Unfortunately, our food sources have all but killed the healthy bugs.  Yogurts may have tiny amounts of probiotics, but far too low for most therapeutic purposes; and, yogurt may not have all of the differing forms of these healthy bugs that you need.

Medical strains of probiotics exist that have proven health benefits.  Different supplement companies that sell them provide a wide variety of combinations, strength and forms of these probiotics.  Just because one label says the capsule contains 14 billion bugs does not mean that they are potent or even alive!  If they are dead they are a waste.  If you ask most people about probiotics they will tell you about lactobacillus acidophilus in yogurt.  Fewer still will know of the special health benefits of saccromyces boulardii (health yeast) for conditions as varied as acute and chronic infections, and inflammatory bowel disease.  Even fewer still will have heard of lactobacillus plantarum which helps reduce inflammation in the small intestine that is present in most malabsorption disorders.  It is the rare person indeed that knows of saccromyces cervesae – a healthy form of yeast that Dr. Michael Wald has pionerred into an effective treatment for those with ulcerative colitis and crohn’s disease (inflammatory bowel disease).  This article is too brief to review the important considerations involving the use and purchase of these “healthy bugs” such as: how does one determine quality (nope! Not just higher numbers of bugs); how much to take? When is the best time to supplement with them? Should they be taken on an empty stomach, with food and near digestive enzymes?  These are questions you might want to ask Dr. Michael Wald directly.  He teaches this topic as part of his gastrointestinal course provided to health care doctors across the United States and Canada.

Cholesterol Lowering

Probiotics such as acidophilus, B. logum, bifidus and saccromyce's boulardii lower cholesterol through a number of mechanisms:  Quick summary - Probiotics increase bile flow; increased bile flow helps to breakdown cholesterol that is normally excreted in the intestines and reduces it's reabsorption back into the body (this would raise blood cholesterol levels).

Reduce Inflammation

Probiotics reduce intestinal and systemic inflammation (found throughout the body) that may play a role in raising cholesterol levels.

Balance pH (acidity-alkalinity)

Probiotics help to adjust the small intestine and large intestine pH (level of acidity or alkalinity); imbalanced intestinal pH promotes inflammation and an increase in the endogenous production (produced in the body) of cholesterol which is an ANTI-INFLAMMATORY.  If you didn’t know, cholesterol has many health benefits also such as: reducing cancer risk (levels of cholesterol below 160 mg/dL are associated with higher cancer risks); cholesterol functions as an antioxidant (this is a good thing!); cholesterol is the “mother hormone” producing pregnenolone, progesterone, testosterone, DHEA, estrone, estradiole, estriole; and many other functions too numerous to mention here.

Hormone Balancing

Probiotics help manage hormone metabolism; low levels of healthy bugs in the intestinal track lead to raised blood levels of cholesterol; cholesterol forms estrogens, testosterone and progesterone.  Reestablishing normal healthy flora reduces excessive cholesterol levels helping to ward off abnormally high hormone levels.  High levels of cholesterol may be related to excessive production in the body of estrogen that has been linked to breast and prostate cancer. Intestinal Health

Probiotics improve the production of an important short-chain fatty acid known as butyrate; low levels of butyrate cause an increase in cholesterol; increased colon cancer risk and inflammatory bowel diseases.

Probiotics are NOT all the same!

Not all probiotic supplements are the same.  How they are manufactured matters.  Often people consume probiotics that have been heat treated and they are either dead or inactive (useless).  The type of probitic(s) should be tailored to the individual.  For example, acidophilus is best for vaginitis that is bacterial in origin; colon cancer requires bifidobacterium which helps shrink cancer tumors; saccromyces boulardii is important for certain types of fungal infections – they are just a few examples.  Dr. Wald teaches doctors and health care providers how to manage difficult gastrointestinal disorders and other health problems with the proper use of probiotics.  Do you take them with digestive enzymes? How about with foods?  This all depends on one’s health goals.  Contact Dr. Wald for more!

 

REFERENCES

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20945142 - lowers serum cholesterol, improved nutrition, microbial balance, and immuno-enhancement of the intestinal tract

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19515264 - lowers cholesterol, reduces colon cancer risk, raises HDL

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20699581 - the probiotic bifidobacterium activates certain genes that enhance fat metabolism promoting weight loss

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20640165 - lowers many harmful blood fats