REFERENCES

One of our practitioners, Dr. Michael Wald, DC, has written the most extensive book on the topic of medically applied intravenous nutrition. As an author in this important area of health care we believe that we are positioned to provide excellent care for those who have been recommended intravenous nutritional therapies. 

Thank you for consulting our scientific reference section. Below is just a small sample of the supportive studies regarding your particular area of interest. Studies may be directly or indirectly related to this area of health care. We pride ourselves upon "thinking outside of the box" such that we base much of our wellness approaches upon a scientific evidence base.  It is important for you to realize that the references below are not provided to necessarily support the particular approach described within this section of our website.  If you would like further evidence or support or simply have questions please feel free to email us directly at: www.info@intmedny.com or call us at 94-242-8844 (Ext. 1).

http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/69/6/2260.full - Bicarbonate Increases Tumor pH and Inhibits Spontaneous Metastasis

http://www.pnas.org/content/102/38/13604.short - Pharmacologic ascorbate concentrations selectively kills cancer cells: Actions as a prodrug to deliver hydrogen peroxide to tissues

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23621620 - Parenteral ascorbate as a cancer therapeutic: a reassessment based on pharmacokinetics

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24022818 - The Effect of High Dose Vitamin C On Cancer Cells

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih/gov/pubmed/22728050 Ascorbic acid: chemistry, biology and the treatment of cancer

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23947403 - Intravenous Vitamin C and Inflammation Lowers Cancer Markers and Improve's Outcome

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22963460 Effects of High Dose Intravenous Vitamin C on Cancer Patients

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16157892 Pharmacologic ascorbic acid concentrations selectively kill cancer cells: action as a pro-drug to deliverhydrogen peroxide to tissues.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20068072 Mechanisms of ascorbate-induced cytotoxicity in pancreatic cancer.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22332036 Vitamin C: a concentration-function approach yields pharmacology and therapeutic discoveries.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15698458 Vitamin C administration could result in a lower need of iron sucrose to correct anemia.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15645737 This study showed that in hemodialysis patients with a functional iron deficiency, treatment with intravenous ascorbic acid can prevent iron overload due to treatment with intravenous iron, and provide a useful adjuvant means of maintaining hemoglobin and serum iron levels.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15625935 Intravenous ascorbic acid increases the bioavailability of iron.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15451067 Ascorbate may protect arteriolar vasoconstrictor responsiveness in sepsis by inhibiting excessive NO production.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15377062 Intravenous ascorbic acid as a treatment for severe jellyfish stings. The patient received ambulatory treatment with parenteral and oral ascorbate with remarkable recovery.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15068981 Only intravenous administration of vitamin C produces high plasma and urine concentrations that might have antitumor activity.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14606098 High-dose vitamin C has therapeutic efficacy on acute pancreatitis. The potential mechanisms include promotion of anti-oxidizing ability, blocking of lipid peroxidation in the plasma and improvement of cellular immune function.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12897088 The co-infusion of vitamin C and -arginine led to a greater increase of renal plasma flow (RPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in smokers than the infusion of arginine alone.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12874821 This study analyzes the cytoprotection by pro-vitamin C against ischemic injuries in rats. In conclusion, the serum release of the intracellular enzyme CPK due to ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury decreased upon injection with pro-vitamin C, 2-O-alpha-D-glucosylated derivative (Asc2G) of ascorbic acid.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12776276 Vitamin C can be used as an effective adjuvant therapy to erythropoietin response (EPO) in hemodialysis patients.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11411094 High-dose vitamin C therapy is considered to be effective in some cases of inclusion body myositis (IBM).