REFERENCES

Thank you for consulting our scientific reference section. Below is just a small sample of the supportive studies regarding your particular area of interest. Studies may be directly or indirectly related to this area of health care. We pride ourselves upon "thinking outside of the box" such that we base much of our wellness approaches upon a scientific evidence base.  It is important for you to realize that the references below are not provided to necessarily support the particular approach described within this section of our website.  If you would like further evidence or support or simply have questions please feel free to email us directly at: www.info@intmedny.com or call us at 94-242-8844 (Ext. 1).

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8865138 - t is concluded that hormone replacement therapy, with estrogens alone or estrogens combined with progestins, may have important effects on the risk of cancer, particularly in the breast and endometrium. Therefore, when making a risk-benefit assessment of long-term HRT, possible risk relationships should be considered.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21464264 - Bioidentical hormones that are approved by the FDA may be preferred over standard hormone replacement because of their physiologic benefits and safetyprofile.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17217322 - Bioidentical hormone preparations have demonstrated effectiveness in addressing menopausal symptoms. The author advocates for continued research on bioidentical hormones and concludes there is currently sufficient evidence to support their preferred use over that of their synthetic cousins.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12201829 - treatment with GH replacement therapy, improvements in QoL are observed and maintained long-term over several years.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19020387 - Measurements of quality of life in patients with growth hormone deficiency.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21969523 - The presence of MetS (metabolic syndrome) in GHD may therefore contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality found in these patients.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18537700 - Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I as an endocrine axis in Alzheimer's disease.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21865409 - Growth hormone therapy in adults with confirmed GH deficiency reduces weight and body fat, increases lean body mass and increases edema and joint stiffness. Most trials demonstrated improvement in quality of life measures.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15320746 - In terms of the mechanisms for the age-related impairment in bone formation, a deficiency in growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system that occurs with age has been proposed to play a major role. 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20930497 - GH/IGF-I axis is involved in the regulation of brain growth, development, and metabolism. Dysfunctions in GH/IGF-I axis in most of ND are therefore reviewed. 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22023735 - The pilot study showed that combined treatment with an oral testosterone and a supplement drink was well tolerated and safe, and reduced the number of people hospitalised and duration of hospital admissions in undernourished, community dwelling older people. 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21797916 - Testosterone appears to maintain insulin sensitivity in normal men.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12425705 -  In this study, GH with or without sex steroids in healthy, aged women and men increased LBM and decreased fat mass. 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19602554 - GH administration to healthy older individuals for 6 months increased insulin resistance with moderately beneficial effects on lipids.